Reprints and reports are available on the download pages listed to the left
Wesley G. Skogan has been a faculty member at Northwestern University since 1971, and
holds joint appointments in the Political Science Department and the University's Institute
for Policy Research.  His research focuses on the interface between the public and the
legal system, in crime prevention, victim services, and community-oriented policing.

His most recent books on policing are:  
Police and Community in Chicago (2006),
Community Policing: Can It Work? (2003), On the Beat: Police and Community Problem
(1999) and Community Policing, Chicago Style (1997). These are all empirical
studies of community policing initiatives in Chicago and elsewhere.  His 1990 book
Disorder and Decline examined public involvement in these programs, their efficacy, and
the issues involved in police-citizen cooperation in order maintenance; this book won a
prize from the American Sociological Association. Prof. Skogan is also the author of two
lengthy reports in the Home Office Research Series examining citizen contact and
satisfaction with policing in Britain; reprints of both are available here. He is co-editor of a
policy-oriented report from the National Research Council in Washington, DC:
and Effectiveness in Policing: The Evidence

In February 2015 he testified before President Obama's Task Force on Policing for the
21st Century, on community policing.

His second line of research concerns neighborhood and community responses to crime.  
This includes work on fear of crime, the impact of crime on neighborhood life, and crime
prevention efforts by community organizations. His book
Coping with Crime dealt  with all
of these issues; a reprint is available here. An article on fear that is available on this web
site is "Crime and the Racial Fears of White Americans." Some of his research on
participation in neighborhood crime prevention programs is reported in two reprints
available here: "Community Organizations and Crime," and "Communities, Crime, and
Neighborhood Organization."

Prof. Skogan has also been involved in research on criminal victimization and the
evaluation of service programs for victims. His first book (
Sample Surveys of Victims of
) and a more recent one (Crime Victims) reflect this interest.  He edited a series of
technical monographs on victimization research that were published by the US
Government Printing Office.  He is the author of a major technical review of the National
Crime Survey that  was published in Public Opinion Quarterly.

Prof. Skogan has been a visiting scholar at the Max-Planck-Institut (Freiburg), the Dutch
Ministry of Justice (WODC), the University of Alberta, and Johns Hopkins University. He
spent two years as a Visiting Fellow at the National Institute of Justice. He served as a
consultant to the British Home Office, developing and analyzing the British Crime Survey.
He has twice testified before committees of the US Congress. He has served on the
editorial boards of many academic journals, ranging from the Journal of Criminal Law and
Criminology to Evaluation Review and the British Journal of Criminology. He is a Fellow of
the American Society of Criminology, a member of the Scientific Committee of the
International Society of Criminology, and a Senior Fellow of the Open Society Institute.
From 1999-2004 he chaired the National Research Council’s Committee on Research on
Police Policies and Practices, and was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Law and
Justice. In January 2007, a journal of the American Political Science Association ranked
him (at 14th) one of the “Top 25" members of his age cohort in terms of academic
citations, and across all political scientists he ranked as the 16th most cited member of
the profession’s American Politics subfield.

In 2015 he was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Achievement Award in Evidence-Based
Crime Policy from the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. This award is the center's
highest honor and recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution and
commitment to advance the integration of science with criminal justice practice. This
award celebrates CEBCP's core values of doing rigorous science and translating
research into practice. The award was celebrated at the Annual Symposium of the Center
for Evidence-Based Crime Policy which will take place at the George Mason University.

Here is my acceptance speech
Wesley G.Skogan
See my blog here
Chaque page comprend
des traductions françaises
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